urban exploration

Swimming Cities of Serenissima

It has been a while. I know. Late, but no less spectacular. In 2009, Brooklyn street artis Swoon and some of her friends cruised on homemade rafts made from New York City garbage from Koper, Slovenia to Venice, Italy. Called the Swimming Cities of Serenissima, the boats looked like something out of the 1990s post-apocalyptic movies ‚Tank Girl‘ and ‚Waterworld‘ sprinkled with a bit of swamp water. Not only the craft themselves was made from re-used material, (including modified Mercedes car engines), but the team also picked up more flotsam and jetsam on their crossing, which they installed in a »cabinet of wonders«. It looks like a lot of fun and performance appears to be really good. (via Global Yodel).

Swimming Cities of Serenissima

Swimming Cities of Serenissima

Swimming Cities of Serenissima

All images © Tod Seelie.

Concierge

Karl Philips is a young Belgian artist for whom a mild kind of activism is inextricably linked to his work. With his performing art, he explores the distinctions between public and non-public, common- and underground, us and them. In 2010, he created a mobile »apartment« attached to a billboard. Concierge is a transparent foldable pop-up shelter for homeless people on the back of company’s product placement.

Concierge, Homeless shelter / temporary installation, mixed media (5 x 6.50 x 3.70 m), 2010

Concierge, Homeless shelter, temporary installation, mixed media (5 x 6.50 x 3.70 m), 2010

Concierge

Concierge

Social Pool

Alfredo Barsuglia’s Social Pool is an eleven-by-five-feet wide pool in the Southern California desert, open for anybody to use. Prerequisites for spa delights: A good transport connection and some free time. The drive and walk to the pool should provide »time to reflect on social values, dreams and reality«, the artist explains.

Alfredo Barsuglia, Social Pool, 2014, long-term installation, California

lfredo Barsuglia, Social Pool, 2014, long-term installation, California

Pallet

This is for the masses, for people who just want to run it: »The space between the tram tracks in Bratislava is 435 mm narrower than the gauge of tracks in Prague or Pilsen (1435 mm). The wooden europallet, a basic feature of any warehouse or storage hall, with its standartized 1200 x 800 mm dimensions, when modified can only run on the tracks in Bratislava.

A new transport vehicle brings change into the spatial perspective of a passenger in motion and generally changes the life of the city, through which the pallet can run, guided by a map of the city lines.« Find out more about riding tram tracks by watching Pallet.

Pallet © Tomáš Moravec, 2008

Pallet © Tomáš Moravec, 2008