train

Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe

Mexican artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene, also known as Los Ferronautas, built a self-made rail vehicle (which could also travel by road) to explore abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador. Between 2010 and 2012, they both travelled across the two countries in the so-called SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada) uncovering hundreds of modern ruins. Altogether, they drove almost 9,000 kilometres collecting stories, film footage and audio surrounding railways that had been abandoned since 1995, when Mexico privatized their rail system. In their first London exhibition, SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe – Modern Ruins 1:220, commissioned by The Arts Catalyst and presented in partnership with Furtherfield Gallery, the artists explore how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes and reflect on the two poles of the social experience of technology – use and obsolescence. Watch this video to find out more.

SEFT-1

SEFT-1

SEFT-1

All images Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene, SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe – Modern Ruins 1:220.

psychylustro

A new work of Berlin-based artist Katharina Grosse. psychylustro transforms one of Philadelphia’s major transportation thoroughfares with a series of seven bright, bold installations along the city’s rail gateway between 30th Street and North Philadelphia stations. The work unfolds in a series of seven passages – from vast, dramatic warehouse walls to small buildings and stretches of green spaces — meant to be framed through the windows of the moving train, creating a real-time landscape painting that explores shifting scale, perspective and the passage of time. Magic train world.

psychylustro - The Drama Wall / 2014 / acrylic on wall, floor, and various objects

psychylustro – The Drama Wall / 2014 / acrylic on wall, floor, and various objects

psychylustro by Katharina Grosse

psychylustro by Katharina Grosse

The City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program is the largest public art program in the United States. All images © by Steve Weinik.

Early work…

untitled / 2008 / acrylic on wall and floor

untitled / 2008 / acrylic on wall and floor

Katharina Grosse

Stainless, Alexanderplatz

Filmed in Tokyo, New York and Berlin, filmmaker Adam Magyar positioned himself on trains as they pulled into subway stops, filming the waiting crowds at 50 frames per second using a high speed camera. The shot is steady and smooth, no shaking or swerving. His videos are 56 times longer than reality. The sound is the train’s sound, slowed down by the same scale. Visit his vimeo site for more videos.

Adam Magyar – Stainless, Alexanderplatz (excerpt), 2011

High speed video recording in Berlin at U2 Alexanderplatz station (2011).